Tag Archives: Dogs

Tick Season is here-help protect your dog from Lyme Disease

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lyme Disease is a tick-borne illness and it can be debilitating in humans, but also in dogs..

In humans, often, but not always, one can tell if they have been infected if there appears a “bull’s-eye” rash at the site of the bite.  This does not happen with dogs.  So what are the common symptoms found in dogs with Lyme Disease?

  1. Fever
  2. Swelling in joints or lameness
  3. Swollen lymph nodes
  4. Lethargy
  5. Loss of appetite

It can be a difficult disease to recognize.  Dogs can have Lyme disease organisms for over a year, without showing any symptoms, and when the symptoms appear, the Lyme disease can have spread throughout the entire dog’s body.

What should you do to help prevent your pet from getting Lyme Disease?

  1.  Of course, the obvious is stay away from grassy, wooded, sandy areas.  This does not seem fair to your dog, as most love the out of doors.  In addition,  they can also be found in urban parks and dog parks.  You can do a little research to learn about the ticks and diseases in your area.
  2. If your dog has been outdoors in any of these areas, check thoroughly for ticks.  They are not always easy to find, as they can be as tiny as the head of a pin.  If the tick is moving, that is good as it has not fed yet and easy to remove.
  3. There is a safe and effective vaccine.  It is given twice, at two or three week intervals. You must repeat this vaccination  every year to be effective.
  4. During an annual checkup, you can include a vector-borne disease screening.
  5. Use a tick control product, often it is combined with a flea control. Be sure and read the labels or consult your Vet as some of these applications can be concentrated.  They come in many forms:
  • Spot-on medications
  • Pills that are given once a month
  • Shampoos (a process that needs to be repeated every 2 weeks)
  • Tick Dips
  • Tick Collars.

Even though these can be very effective, it is still important to check your dog after being outdoors, especially if you have been in a woody, grassy or sandy area.

If you do find a tick, protect your fingers and remove with a tick remover or a pair of tweezers.  You must be sure and get the entire tick out, so pull straight, do not twist.

Treatments for your Dog if infected with Lyme-Disease

There are several antibiotics that are available and they are quite effective, especially if caught in the early stages.  The response time to the antibiotic can be within a week.

Educating yourself about ticks and Lyme disease is a great step in keeping your dog healthy so you can both enjoy the great outdoors.

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Why does my dog follow my every move? Why does my dog destroy things when I am away? Why does my dog pace or run in circles when I am leaving the house?

  • Cooper

These behaviors and others like:

  • Housebreaking accidents
  • Barking, howling, or whining
  • Not eating or not chewing on his/hers favorite toy
  • Scratching, digging, or trying to escape
  • Excessive grooming
  • Drooling

can be signs that your dog is suffering from separation anxiety.  Separation anxiety in terms of pets describes stress and anxiousness brought on by leaving your dog alone even if for a split second.  Often these signs are confused with “bad manners”, which is true in some cases, but not all.  Separation anxiety can be a serious issue and disciplining (eg. yelling or scolding), can make the anxiety worsen.  Often, regular obedience training does not help.

What can I do to help my dog get over separation anxiety?

First, please consult your veterinarian.  Sometimes the treatment requires a combination of medication(s) with behavior modification, especially when the case is severe.

What types of behavior modifications are suggested for separation anxiety?

First, be sure your dog is not bored by adding more physical and mental stimulation. This will usually take care of  boredom issues but will usually not take care of separation anxiety issues.   Often bored dogs will scarf down their food then look for more, anywhere including your garbage, but in most cases, the opposite is true of a dog with separation anxiety.

Behaviorists suggest changing up your “leaving routine”.  Your pet is very aware of your routine before leaving home, grabbing your coat first, or shutting off the lights, then lastly grabbing your keys.  Mix this up and do some of these things randomly during the day while you are still remaining home.  In time, perhaps only a few weeks, your dog may see that these behaviors don’t mean you are leaving and some or all of this anxiety may lessen greatly.

Also, don’t overcompensate your departure or return.  Don’t give treats or give special attention before you leave or when you return.  Don’t fuss over them, as hard as this is to do, especially when you are so happy to see them when you come home.  Try to ignore your dog for a few minutes before you leave and when you return.  Your dog may get the idea that your leaving is not a big deal.

For extreme cases, there is a program you can try, but first, consult your veterinarian to be sure there your dog is not suffering from some other ailment or illness. This program *  requires a huge time commitment on your part, at least several weeks.    This  will mean you will need to take time off ,if you work, use your vacation time, or find a pet sitter or doggie daycare to assist you.  You will need to spend 30 minutes to an hour every training session.  It requires patience and consistency.  Initially, you leave your home for a few seconds and step right back in so your pet has little or no time to experience separation anxiety.  Always stay calm while inside. Continue to do this until you see no signs of anxiety.  Gradually increase the time you are out, but change up the time (eg. 2 minutes, 1 minute, 4 minutes, 1 minute, 5 minutes) until you see no signs of anxiety.  You continue to do this gradually increasing to an hour, two hours, etc. until you can be away a full work day.

If this does not help, you will need to contact your veterinarian,again, who, hopefully will be able to help you find the cause of your dog’s anxiety issues and perhaps recommend an experience behaviorist who has worked with this disorder and/or prescribe proper medication.

*This program is suggested by Amy Bender, Dog Expert (www.dogs.about.com).

Please note: This article has been provided for informational purposes only. If your pet is showing any signs of illness, please consult a veterinarian as quickly as possible.

 

Dogs & Cats & TV & A Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book mention

 

dog & TV

 

 

 

 

Hi Everypawdy!

We like to share and there is a very interesting blog called “Owned by a Husky”  see the link below.  The latest blog post is about “The Truth behind dogs and Cats watching TV?”  Do they?  Check this out and check out the pssssssst: for a Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book mention.

Here is the website address to copy and paste into your browser.

http://www.ownedbyahusky.ca/2014/12/the-truth-behind-dogs-watching-tv.html

Thank you for the mention Jenna,Mark “HuskyCrazed” Drady.

Happy Holidays!

Susan and Janet and all your friends with Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books  www.tailsuntold.com

 

Petting a Dog or Cat is Mutually Therapeutic

Dog & Baby

 

 

Did you know that petting your dog or cat has mutual benefits? It seems obvious that your pet gets pleasure from petting and shows it in many ways like rubbing up against you, nudging you, and often we see a smile and a gleam in their eye from petting.

For humans, petting often triggers the release of a hormone called oxytocin, which is a bonding hormone. They say that petting a dog for only 15 minutes can also release other feel good hormones such as serotonin and prolactin.   Another benefit is that the stress hormone called cortisol, has been known to be lowered by petting.  Studies have shown that the same effect happens with cats.

For those suffering with mild depression, by petting your pet, it stops you from focusing on your problems and looking inward and digging into a deeper hole. Your energies are now focused on your pet and it helps to take the worry and the depressive thoughts and turn them toward something positive and loving, outside of your own mind. What is amazing is our pets can usually tell when we are feeling blue and will often stay closer to us and want to snuggle more.

Many studies have shown that not only do we get the positive effects of petting, but our pets get the same kind of benefits, too.

So keep petting your pet so you both enjoy that mutual benefit that has been termed “the love loop”.

P.S. Do you think a cat and dog petting each other has the same effect?  [Photo: Courtesy of Funagram]

 

 

 

Tails Untold Guest Blog Post

Hey All you Pet Lovers,

Come Enter! We have a new Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book Contest.

TUPPB Spring Photo Contes

Hi All,

Spring is just around the corner!

Come visit our Facebook page to enter our latest Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book Photo Contest to win a wonderful Nicia Pet Couture collar.

Here is the link!  http://bitly.com/1kXdfxU

Can’t wait to see all the entries! Please share with all your friends, too.

Susan, Janet and all your friends at Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books

 

Taking Your Dog to the Beach

Now that summer is here, many of us flock to the beaches for fun in the sand and surf. We often would like to treat our dogs to the same enjoyment. However, not all dogs swim naturally and breeds like corgis and pugs do not swim at all. In order to find out if your dog will swim, find a gentle lake or calm day on the ocean. See if your dog will come in the water after you. Never force the issue.

In order to insure that your dog has a safe and enjoyable day, there are several things to keep in mind:

1. Dogs may like to drink salt water. It should be discouraged as it can lead to stomach upset. So keep plenty of fresh drinking water with you to provide for your dog frequently during your romp at the beach.

2. Believe it or not, dogs need sunscreen just like you do. Ask you pet supply store for one made for dogs.  Apply to the nose and ears ahead of time. Repeat after swimming or strenuous exercise.

3. There are certain situations that can put your dog in danger such as high waves, currents and rip tides.  it would behoove you to invest in a life jacket made for dogs. The best ones are those with 3 latch points and a handle on the back in case you need to get your dog out of a dangerous situation.

4. Watch out for underwater hazards like coral, sharp rocks and even jellyfish. Keep an eye out for cuts or scrapes after a swim. Beach hazards such as seashells can also hurt your dogs paws.

5. Loud noises from motor boats or jet skis can be scary to your pet. Find a dog-friendly beach where these power craft are not allowed if your dog is sensitive to loud noise.

6. Really cold water is not good for a dog with arthritis or joint problems. Shallow water and bays or inlets tend to be warmer and more comfortable.

7. Watch for signs of heat exhaustion. Symptoms may include excess panting, drooling, enlarged hanging tongue, pale gums and general lethargy. You and your pet should have a cool place out of the sun to rest after running on the sand or swimming in the surf. These activities can really tire your dog out. Portable beach cabanas are a good investment.

8. When you shower off, let your dog shower too. This gets the sand out from between his paw pads and the salt off his fur. Dry his ears thoroughly so moisture does not lead to ear problems.

9. You can find out which beaches at your destination allow dogs. One website is [Pet Friendly Travel.com]. It also includes pet-friendly campgrounds, off-leash dog parks and dog-friendly shopping malls.

Enjoy a fun-filled day at the beach with your dog with these suggestions in mind. And don’t forget the poop bags!

dogs and cushings disease

Older dogs may be susceptible to Cushings disease. Cushings disease is caused by an overproduction of the hormone ACTH by the pituitary gland which in turn controls the release of cortisol by the adrenal glands. It is mainly a disease of dogs, not cats. The most common cause is a microscopic benign pituitary tumor which triggers the overproduction of ACTH. These tumors are often found in older dogs. Cushings can affect the function of many organs. In addition, the excess cortisol suppresses the immune system allowing for bacterial infections. The most common infection is in the bladder.

The symptoms include hair loss, primarily on the body, increased appetite and thirst, frequent urination and a pot-bellied look to the abdomen. The skin may be thinner than usual and may bruise more easily. Diagnosis involves hormone injection and monitoring of the dog’s blood and needs to be done over several hours at the veterinarian’s office.

Treatment is with medication to suppress production of glucosteroids. It is a complex plan that involves close monitoring by the veterinarian. The average life span, with treatment is two years or longer. When presented with symptoms of frequent urination and thirst, one might assume diabetes. It is best to consult your veterinarian and suggest he look for Cushings disease as well as other more typical metabolic disorders.

 

Are they dreaming?

I have watched my dog’s paws mimic running and heard her yipping when she appears to be soundly sleeping. My sister’s cat’s whiskers twitch, its tail whips and it swats at imaginary things in the air when it sleeps. Are they really dreaming?

Many scientists believe there is enough evidence that both cats and dogs and many other animals do dream. They have studied animal brains and found that they exhibit REM (rapid eye movement) type of sleep, where the brain is highly active but the person is unresponsive to the environment. During REM sleep, animals show the same kind of brain activity as humans. It is thought that the animal, like its human counterpart, relives experiences its had while awake.

Dogs spend an average of 10% of their sleeping time in REM sleep. Cats, who have been studied with EEG tests average about 30% in REM sleep. Puppies, kittens, and larger dogs can average even greater amounts. It is believed that REM sleep is a time when we sort and file our days events into our memory. So the next time you have an active day with your dog or cat, watch them sleeping afterward. You may just see that experience acted out in their dreams.

dogs and planes

These days, many of us like to travel with our pets. Travel in the car is common, but what about on a plane? If your dog weighs more than 15 pounds, it must fly in the cargo area. If this is the case,  the following tips will help to make it a safe and enjoyable flight for both of you.

  • You will provide the crate with 3 well-ventilated sides and constructed of metal or hard plastic. Be sure it is roomy enough to give your dog breathing space.
  • Try to book a flight that goes straight through to your destination. This helps to keep your dog’s stress level down and avoids the possibility of loss during plane changes.
  • Avoid peak travel times to give attendants more time to handle your pet properly.
  • Be up-to-date with vaccinations.
  • Put something in the crate that is comforting to your dog..even your clothing that smells like you.
  • Have a water dish attached to the crate. That way, if there is an extreme delay, attendants can provide water during the layover. Dogs can go for up to 10 hours without food or water.
  • Do not feed your dog for 6 hours prior to the flight. They may have water up until the flight.
  • When flying during a warm season or to a warm climate, fly only in the morning or late evening. Cargo holds can get hot while the plane is waiting to take off or get to the gate after landing.
  • Put feeding instructions or medication requirements in the crate or attached to it in case your dog is lost.
  • Be sure your dog has an I.D. container attached to it’s collar with your name, address, phone number and where you are going.
  • Enjoy and have a safe flight knowing you’ve thought of everything!