Maximus

Maximum’s NYC Tails Untold Personalized Adventure Book- A very pleased purchaser

Yes, I have received my book. I am very pleased with it. You did a super job on it. We laugh every time we look at it. I have shared it with More »

Storm front cover 2_db

A Happy Fan – Storm’s Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book

Hello Tails Untold, I got the book today.  Thank you so much, it is amazing!   You did a lovely job, thank you, again.  Larissa from Australia. More »

two cats

Should I Adopt One Cat or Two?

When it comes to adopting a new cat or kitten, the question often arises is it better to adopt two so they can have companionship when we are not home? There are More »

Dog & Baby

New Babies and Your Pets

A new baby is on the way and your pets will need to adjust. After all, they were the new babies first. It is a lot like preparing a sibling for a More »

He is a True Celebrity

Sebastian is a Celebrity

Tails Untold is very proud to announce that Sebastian, who recently was the Star of a Tails Untold New York City Adventure Book was just featured in an article in the New More »

What are the Typical Dog Barking Laws? A guest Blog from Stephanie Lynch

barking-dog

We are very pleased to have our guest blogger, Stephanie Lynch, howmuchisit.org, share this wonderful article on Dog Barking Laws. A special thanks to Stephanie from all of us at Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books.

Barking Laws

Barking laws are designed to protect you from chronic barking at your neighbor’s house. Dogs barking can disrupt your sleep, your daily routine and even your health. To protect you from such harm, anti-barking laws are made.

Now, before we get into the specifics of dog barking laws, keep in mind that usually, the best course of action is to contact your neighbor in person. 90 percent of the time, your neighbor wonít know about the issue and will usually do something to resolve the problem. Bypassing this step may often lead to tension or even a lot of wasted time on your part.

Barking laws differ from city to city, but you can learn about them by calling the nearest animal control center or even contacting the local police department. Most of the time, if you search your city plus the word dog barking laws, you will get an official page telling you the local law and how to dispute a barking dog. Do keep in mind that before making a dispute, the local police department will put these complaints on the bottom of the list.

There are many common barking laws found throughout the United States and listed below are the most common types you may find in your local city.

The Multiple-Household Laws

According to this law, barking is considered illegal if the case goes to the court and the victim provides detailed information about the owner, dog and neighbors. The victim has to come forward with some neighbors who have the same complaints before the authorities can take any legal action.

Before it can go to court, however, you will more than likely have to meet with the neighbor, write a detailed letter complaint, file legal papers and gather relevant data. As you can only imagine, hiring a lawyer can be expensive, www.howmuchisit.org if you choose to do it on your own, it can eat up a lot of your time.

This is the only law that requires more than one complaint before the judge may agree to take legal action. There is no specific information in the ordinances of this law as to whether or not it is illegal for the owner to allow their dog to bark. It only depends on the judge to declare that, whether or not, the barking in your situation is illegal. In simple words, this law states the barking is illegal only if the judge says that it is illegal.

The major problem with this law is that most people do not agree to get involved since it can cause conflicts or can take up too much of their time.

The Single Complaint Victim-Driven Laws

To file a complaint according to this law, one has to pass all the procedures as with multiple-household laws but with a single complaint in effect. Only a single victim without any neighbors within a certain radius can take advantage of this law, but most cities don’t have this law in effect, so don’t count on this working for your situation.

The major problem with this law is that it’s going to be you versus the neighbor and most cases don’t make it to court.

The Consecutive-Disruption Ordinances

The consecutive-disruption law only protects you from the noise of a dog that has the habit of barking virtually non-stop. The authorities only take action when the dog barks continuously for a number of minutes, and the amount can be random depending on the local law. Most of the time, it will be around 20 minutes.

This law is not exactly the answer to your problems. Under these ordinances, barking is illegal only if the owner allows the dog to bark continuously without any breaks. But, if the dog stops barking after a few minutes and starts after a few seconds, the countdown resets and begins from the start.

The Common Law

According to this law, if your neighbor’s dog is barking, you can settle the dispute by talking to your neighbor. This law forces the people to settle their disputes by talking to each other before going to the authorities. Most of the time, a neighbor may not know about their dog’s barking and will take action to prevent it, while others may be stubborn and tell you to get lost. Whatever your local laws may be, this is often the first route you will have to take. If you’re curious about the dog laws more in details, BarkingDogs.net went into more detail, along with stories about people who have successfully worked with the law.

More Shelter/Rescue Donations from Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books

We are so thankful to our Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book Purchasers.  New Donations from the sale of these books have been made to:

Little Shelter Animal Rescue & Adoption Center   www.littleshelter.com/#home

Paws ‘n’ Claws Animal Shelter   www.petango.com/pawsnclaws

Superfoods for your dog

Super Stories About Healthy Superfoods For Your Dog  

One of my favorite “dog tails,” especially when it comes to healthy eating habits and snacks for our pets, actually comes from one my own personal experiences. It happened one day when I took my dog to the vet when she was acting particularly peculiar. She was very listless, lethargic and was showing some obvious signs of doggie dehydration.

Come to find out, my canine had accidentally consumed a large quantity of carpet fibers and the mass was blocking and interfering with her digestive system. When my caring veterinarian suggested surgery might be necessary, I was mortified, but she said she wanted to try something much cheaper and less invasive first … pumpkin … and I was intrigued.

 

pumpking for blog

 

Pumpkin Patch

The good dog doctor led me behind the front counter of her office and opened a cupboard that contained dozens of cans of neatly stacked, solid-pack pumpkin, the kind used to make holiday pies. Unbeknownst to me at the time, pumpkin aides with a dog’s overall digestive system along with a number of other healthy benefits. Low and behold, several hours later, my canine had “passed” the mass without the need of a scalpel.

To this very day, I still keep pumpkin on hand, mostly in portions that I keep frozen, and give them to my dog as a treat, especially during warmer summer months as a “pup-sicle”. You can also mix it in with their regular food as a digestive aid and offers a number of additional health benefits.

 

Chewy Carrots & Crunchy Yams

Another healthy treat from my personal vault of pet stories, my dog also enjoys raw carrots. She thinks they’re some kind of a chew toy and when I toss one to her, she gnaws on it until it eventually disappears, as she devours every last scrap. Yams and sweet potatoes are also enjoyed by canines and can be served sliced raw or dehydrated.

Carrots and sweet potatoes are obviously a lot cheaper than traditional chew toys and snacks and much better for them. They’re packed with many important vitamins and nutrients that can be very beneficial for canines, young andPaul Bunyon for blog.Broccoli and Other Greens

Being a fan of Paul Bunyan as a child (giving away my age a little), I was fascinated with trees and when my Mom told me Broccoli were in fact tiny trees, I gobbled them up without thinking. Broccoli and many other types of greens are just as healthy for canines as they are for kids.

When I was younger, when spinach went on my plate, since I grew up on old Popeye cartoon reruns (I get it – I’m old), my Mother didn’t have to sell this healthy, leafy green vegetable to me since I wanted to grow up big and strong like the sailor man. The same is true for dogs since spinach is just as healthy for canines as it is for kids.

Just like human children, you’d be surprise at how many of them actually like fruits and vegetables, whether you’re including them in their regular serving of food or serving them outright. Don’t discount certain healthier food choices from your dog’s diet assuming they might not enjoy them … you might be surprised.

For more information on healthy fruits and vegetables for your four-legged best friend, check out this infographic on “7 Superfoods To Add To Your Dog’s Diet.” You’ll both be glad you did.

Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books would like to thank, Amber Kingsley, for this wonderful and informative Guest Blog.

 

Help us Honor Our Pet’s Unsung Heroes-Veterinarians

picture for Vet Blo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4 Reasons to Work with Animals Before You Become a Veterinarian (and How Rover.com Can Help!)-A guest blog from Kelly Wright.

At Rover.com, we love the hardworking vets who have dedicated their careers to making our pets’ lives the best they can be!

That’s what inspired us to interview vets from all over the country for our recent feature, Veterinarians Share the Amazing Stories that Inspired Their Careers. Not only did they tell us the incredible tales behind why they followed their dreams into the field, we also learned that their careers unofficially started way before they donned their white lab coats!

Every vet we interviewed had experience working with animals prior to applying to vet school. And as we discovered, there are many great reasons for future vets to follow their lead (and Rover.com can even help)!

Here are 4 great reasons to work with animals before pursuing your dream of becoming a veterinarian:

You’ll learn about the hard parts of the job.

One of many reasons that vets are so remarkable is that their job is often unspeakably difficult — and not just because science is a tough subject.

“Being a veterinarian can be emotionally challenging,” Dr. Mary Gardner of Lap of Love International admitted. “Many people think we deal with puppies and kittens and fix sick animals all day.”

But unfortunately, despite vets’ best efforts, not every animal has a happy ending. And that doesn’t just take an emotional toll on pet parents — it’s hard for vets when they lose a patient too.

“Unfortunately, the dark side of veterinary medicine is that we suffer greatly from compassion fatigue,” Dr. Monica Dijanic of Beaver Brook Animal Hospital said.

Dr. Gardner agrees. “Being a vet is one of the most honorable jobs in the world to have — but it’s also one of the most compassion-draining fields to be in at the same time,” she explained. “You have to make sure you can handle that aspect of being a veterinarian.”

You’ll learn about being a compassionate caregiver in real-world settings.

You can’t learn empathy from a college textbook, but you will learn about it by working directly with animals — whether they’re your own pets or someone else’s.

Dr. Laura Ziegler of DoveLewis volunteered with the Humane Society and did search and rescue dog training when she was in grade school. She also learned a lot through her personal experience of caring for her own dog.

“Cuddles was a sweet little girl, but she had all the problems that miniature poodles have,” she remembered. “She had a collapsing trachea. She also had a liver shunt and had to have surgery, so I learned all about that when I was a kid.”

Through her experience both in and outside of her home, Dr. Ziegler acquired a special perspective on some of the tough times families face when caring for pets. This type of insight is vital to a veterinarian’s training outside of the classroom, and the best way to get it is through hands-on experiences.

You’ll learn how to work with different types of animals.

It’s not always raining cats and dogs — vets work with all kinds of animals!

“In high school, I volunteered with our local animal shelter and the local zoo to get more experience learning about and taking care of all different types of animals,” Dr. Tyler Carmack of Hampton Roads Veterinary Hospice told us.

Working with a variety of animals creates more well-rounded veterinarians who can confidently treat whatever critters come their way. You’ll also open yourself up to other aspects of animal care that may be of more interest to you than working with domestic animals.

Speaking of other ways to put your vet training into action…

You’ll learn about job opportunities outside of working in a clinic.

Through your work with animals, you’ll learn there are all kinds of ways you can utilize your training as a vet. You’re not limited to a traditional doctor’s office setting if you have your sights set on a different horizon!

For example, Dr. Elizabeth Carney of Peaceful Pet Passage is a mobile veterinarian. Rather than having patients drop by for care, she hits the road to see them where they live.

“As a mobile vet, I love being on the road versus working in an office setting,” she said.

There are also vets who rarely (if ever!) treat domesticated pets, as they specialize in other areas of animal care. Just about any place you venture that provides a home to animals works with a vet to ensure their creatures are as happy and healthy as possible. Here are a few ideas on where you can share your animal expertise outside of a clinic:

  • Zoos
  • Aquariums
  • Farms
  • Rescue organizations or animal shelters
  • Animal sanctuaries
  • Conservation societies
  • State and federal park and wildlife departments

If you’re looking for a fun opportunity to work with animals, pet sitting with Rover.com is a great way to get started!

“It’s important to have practical experiences with animals, whether it be petsitting, volunteering, or working with them in another way,” Dr. Carmack noted.

“Do something that helps you stand out from the crowd of other would-be veterinarians and gives you a unique perspective on animal care.”

Guest Blogger Kelly Wright explores and celebrates the magical and mysterious bond between pets and people for Rover.com’s Animal Heroes section. If you have an amazing story about how an animal has brought joy and wonder to your life, please email her at kelly@rover.com.

Animal Defense League of Texas Donation

Great news!  We are proud to have donated to the Animal Defense League of Texas today.  This is a no-kill animal shelter in San Antonio.  This was part of the Big Give SA and the Animal Defense League.  I love their motto “Pets are not disposable”.  This donation went to help keep pups cool all summer long by allowing the shelter to build new shade structures that are needed this summer.

At Tails Untold® Personalized Pet Books, we believe every pet deserves a loving and forever home so we donate a portion of the sale of each and every book to a shelter/rescue.

You can visit here to make your own donation.  https://www.givedirectcharity.org/donate/?cid=12201

Happy to Donate to these great organizations

Thanks to the many who purchased a Tails Untold® Personalized Pet Book, we are so pleased to be able to make donations to these wonderful organizations.  We thank you all for all you do to help our furry friends find forever, loving, homes.

The Pasadena Texas Animal Shelter  http://pasadenashelter.com

The Medfield Animal Shelter in Medfield, MA  http://medfieldshelter.com

The Animal Haven Shelter  http://animalleague.org

The Baltimore Humane Society  http://bmorehumane.org

Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness-A guest blog from Dog Guy Josh

We are very pleased to have our guest blogger, Dog Guy Josh, share this wonderful article on how best to be prepared should an emergency or disaster strike.  Thank you, Dog Guy Josh!

Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness
By Dog Guy Josh

Pet First Aid – A Quick Primer
Pet First Aid: When the unexpected happens and your four-legged friend find himself on the injured list, knowing what to do can help him hurry up and heal so that you can heel!

petfirstaid

 

Define “Normal”
When dealing with injuries and potential illness, you won’t know what’s abnormal if you don’t know what’s normal for your dog to begin with. Take the time to familiarize yourself with your dog’s daily input and output (eating, urinating and defecating) habits, as well as how he moves and breathes and how his body feels under your hands as you pet him. Paying close attention to these details can help you quickly recognize when something might be wrong.

In general, the normal heart rate of a healthy dog is:

100-160 BPM for small, miniature or toy breed dogs (30 lbs or less).
60-100 BPM for medium-to-large breed dogs (30+ lbs).
120-160 BPM for puppies under one-year-old.
The heartbeat of a dog can be felt at the point where the left elbow reaches the chest, along the inner thigh, just below the wrist or just below the hock. Practice under calm conditions to determine which method is most comfortable for you and your pet, as well as to monitor his normal heart rate.

Other “Important Norms” to Know:
The normal breathing rate for a dog is 10-30 breaths per minute or up to 200 pants per minute.
The normal body temperature for a dog is approximately 100.2-102.8 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures not within this range should be addressed by a veterinarian.
Capillary refill time (the time it takes the gums or inner lips to return to their normal pink color after you press them) should be between 1-2 seconds.
When pulled upward, the skin at the back of a dog’s neck should spring back to position within 1-2 seconds. A longer return time can indicate dehydration. Dry, sticky gums may also signal dehydration. It’s extremely important that dehydrated animals be taken to a veterinarian for proper care. When in doubt, consult your vet!
The most important information to have on hand during a medical emergency is the name and phone number of the nearest veterinarian and 24-hour veterinary facility. Keep this information on-hand and consider taking a test drive to the local 24-hour facility BEFORE disaster strikes.
Learn Your ABCs!
Whether you’re dealing with pets or people, knowing how to properly administer CPR can mean the difference between life and death! Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is the method used to treat an animal who is not breathing or has no heartbeat. It utilizes rescue breathing and chest compressions and is based on three basic principles which MUST be followed in order:

Airway
Breathing
Circulation
Learning how to properly perform CPR is a wonderful investment in your pet’s future. All pet owners should be proficient in this potentially life-saving, pet first aid skill. Several organizations, including the American Red Cross, offer classes on animal first aid and CPR.

Learn to Recognize a First Aid Emergency
The following medical situations can quickly turn from bad to worse and should be addressed as quickly as possible by a veterinarian:

Shock – The body’s response to a change in blood flow and oxygen to the internal organs. Shock often occurs following sudden blood loss, traumatic injury, severe allergic reaction or infection circulating through the body.
Bloat and Torsion – A condition in which the stomach fills up with air or food, which can cause the stomach to turn around itself, often misplacing the spleen. As this happens, blood supply to the stomach and spleen is lost, damaging the organs and resulting in shock. Bloat and torsion are life-threatening emergencies.
Other emergencies include:

Choking
Bleeding
Allergic Reactions
Luxated (out of joint) or Broken Bones
Breathing Problems
Sudden Trauma
Eye Injuries
Prolonged exposure to extreme temperatures
Training Tips
When preparing for an emergency, it’s as important to train your pet as it is to train yourself! Several easy-to train behaviors can help keep your pet calm and easily accessible during a medical emergency:

Handling and Restraint – Make a habit of handling and gently restraining your pet on a regular basis, rewarding him generously for calm behavior.
Muzzling – Don’t wait until disaster strikes! The best time to introduce your pet to a muzzle is NOT when he’s scared and hurting. Teach him to accept being muzzled by practicing often under calm conditions.
Elizabethan Collar – Like muzzling, teach your pet to calmly tolerate life in an E-Collar under normal conditions.
Confinement – Injured animals often must be confined in order to promote calm behavior necessary for healing. Even if you don’t use a crate on a regular basis, it’s wise to teach your dog to accept spending limited time in a crate or similar confined area.
Disaster Preparedness
Whether your geographic area is prone to earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, tornadoes or other natural disasters, it’s important to have a well thought out household evacuation plan. When planning ahead, consider the following:

Room at the Inn?
If you need to evacuate your home, do not leave your pets behind; they are not likely to survive on their own. For public health reasons, most emergency shelters do not accept pets. Research area hotels/motels that are pet-friendly and identify a few friends and family members who are willing to shelter your pets in an emergency.
May I See Your ID?
Make absolutely certain that your pets wear collars with identification tags at all times. Keep contact information up-to-date. Consider adding a cell phone number or an out-of-area friend or relative to maximize the opportunities for an appropriate caretaker to be contacted regarding your pet. Have your pets microchipped to provide them with a permanent source of identification.
Take Fido “To Go!”
Keep an appropriately sized crate or pet carrier on hand. In the event of a natural disaster, confining your pets in a crate may help prevent injuries from debris. If you do not regularly use a crate, consider occasionally feeding them in their crate to maintain a positive association with confinement.
Packing for Pets
Create a pet survival kit that’s kept in an easily accessible place and contains necessities like 2 weeks worth of pet food, bottled water, food/water bowls, can opener, medications, pet first aid kit and one or more sturdy leashes. Include current medical relevant information about your pet, contact information for your veterinarian as well as for any persons authorized to care for your pet in your absence. It may also be helpful to include a brief medical history and current photo.
Home Away from Home?
Make a list of area boarding facilities, veterinarian offices and shelters. In the event that you are unable to return home right away and need long-term care for your pets, these facilities can assist you in finding appropriate care.
Home Alone?
Not all emergencies take place when you’re home. Designate a nearby friend or family member to check on your pets if necessary. Add a Pet Rescue Sticker to your front door or window to alert rescue personnel of the type and number of animals inside. Stickers can be purchased at most pet stores and are available free of charge at www.aspca.org.

Check out more from Dog Guy Josh

Dog Trainer, Pet Blogger & Business Consultant  www.dogguyjosh.com

Resources:

ASPCA at www.aspca.org/pet-care/disaster-preparedness
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: (800) 426-4435 or www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control
Humane Society of the United States at www.humanesociety.org/about/departments/disaster_preparedness.html
American Red Cross at www.redcross.org
Pettech First Aid & CPR Training at www.pettech.net
Pet First Aid Kits:
www.cpr-savers.com
www.jjdog.com
www.outdoorsafety.net
HSUS Pet First Aid Kit List at www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/pet_first_aid_kit.html
A Quick Primer on Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness
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This was first published by the Association of Professional Dog Trainers, www.apdt.com, 1-800-PET-DOGS.

The Awesome Health Benefits of Having a Four-Legged Family Member

Image via Pixabay

Image via Pixabay

I’ve always been an animal lover, and grew up consistently having at least one family pet as my constant companion. But things change when you become the adult responsible for caring for a family dog, and the extra cleaning that comes with having a pet was not on a list of things I was dying to do!

But my husband and kids were dying to have a pooch in the house so we recently adopted an amazing mutt from a local shelter. It didn’t take long for me to fall absolutely in love, of course, especially after seeing what a positive influence she was on our family. As a matter of fact, I have science to support my claims: Research has shown that dogs provide a number of different emotional and physical health benefits to the humans that love them. Here are a few unique ways man’s best friend has a healthy impact on our lives:

Dogs inspire their owners to get moving. To take the best care of our pups, we have to ensure that they are getting plenty of exercise throughout the day. One of the best ways to do this is to join them in the fun! This article points out how having a family dog can also be an especially effective way to encourage children to play with their pet, and ward off the risk for childhood obesity.

Pooches are an adorable stress-buster. The reason we tend to feel better around our dogs is because interaction with them literally tells our brains to be happy. This article the health benefits of our dogs explains that spending time with our critters releases a hormone called oxytocin, a neurotransmitter known as the “love hormone” because of its role in making us feel connected with others. The higher our oxytocin levels, the more naturally equipped we are to handle stress.

They have potentially-lifesaving olfactory senses. Dogs are known for their acute sense of smell, and now they are using it to help their two-legged companions. Research has shown that dogs are able to detect health issues such as low blood sugar in diabetics and even some infections. Scientists are also now studying the canine ability to detect cancer, and hope to create a form of technology based on dogs’ natural gift of smell.

They provide uniquely compassionate therapy to those coping with cancer. Because of their abilities to boost the mood of those around them, dogs are frequent visitors to cancer patients undergoing treatment, and can be instrumental in managing emotional stress that often leads to serious mental health issues like depression. According to Cancer Treatment Centers of America, their presence also provides physical benefits such as a decrease in pain and blood pressure.

Dogs don’t just provide us with unconditional love and incessantly wagging tails. In fact, sharing our homes with them may actually provide many unique and wonderful health advantages. A new dog may even be the health remedy you’ve been seeking!

***

Thank you for this great information from our Guest Blogger, Vee Cecil!  Please let us know how your pet whether a cat/dog/bird/hamster/or any pet has improved your life!  We love your comments.

Vee Cecil is a wellness coach, personal trainer, and bootcamp instructor. Vee is passionate about studying and sharing her findings in wellness through her recently-launched blog.

Seizure Alert Dogs

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Most dogs are very perceptive at reading their owner’s body language. They seem to know when their owners are happy, sad, distressed or anxious. This ability has allowed some dogs to be able to sense changes in their owner’s body or behaviors prior to a seizure. They do this within seconds minutes or hours before the seizure occurs.

Dogs have their own ways of letting their owners know of an impending seizure. They may bark, become restless, paw at or lick their owner’s hand. This alerts the person to seek a safe place to sit or lie down to prevent falls that might occur with the seizure.

No one is sure why or how a dog is able to recognize that a seizure is coming. Theorists believe that it may be a change in the person’s behavior, body language or even an odor that the person emits prior to the seizure. This ability to recognize an impending seizure is not something that is trained and is a common phenomenon in many dogs. It does not seem to be related to a dog’s breed, age or whether the dog is a male or a female. Seizure alert dogs are ones that are very sensitive to a humans behavior or emotions. When a person comes out of a seizure, they tend to be disoriented or confused. Having their dog by their side can help re-orient them to their environment. Their dog’s presence is also a comfort. It is known that dogs can help to eliminate daily stressors in our lives. People with seizure disorders can sometimes increase their number of seizures when under stress. Having a loving canine companion may help to prevent this increase.

So seizure alert dogs are important to helping keep their owners safe. They help eliminate their owners fears of seizures and make their daily lives much easier.

Summer Safety Tips from Canine Camp Getaway Veterinarians

Cocker with visor 3Dog & cat heat

Hello All you Pet Lovers,

I am pleased to share this information from Canine Camp Getaway’s Veterinarians.  This is excellent advice and something I think all pet owners should review every summer, so please pass along.

1) Be cautious walking your dogs on hot pavement or cement — their pads are tough, but can burn just like your skin.

2) A summer haircut CAN help keep your pets cooler, but a too-short cut can make them even more vulnerable to the effects of sun and heat.

3) This seems like a no-brainer, but every year dogs die in hot cars. There is no “okay” time frame to leave a dog in a car in the summer.

4) Summer pests don’t only trouble humans — be sure your dog is protected from both internal and external parasites.

5) Drive carefully! More outdoor activities and open doors/windows can mean more dogs outside, on-leash and off, so slow down — and don’t get distracted by cell phones, texts or changing radio stations. Be sure to regularly inspect your yard for any holes or breaks in perimeter security.

6) Practice water safety — not all dogs can swim, especially in ocean water with waves and currents.

7) Be cautious of which pesticides, fertilizers, and mulches you or your landscaper are using; not all are pet-safe.

8) Wildlife is out and about — be sure your dog is current on vaccinations such as rabies and leptospirosis, if appropriate.

9) We see far more dog fights in the summer months than others — when socializing your dog at the park, be alert to his or her activities. Avoid distractions such as talking on your cell phone which may impede your response time.

10) Access to fresh, cold water is even more important now than other times of year.

11) BBQs can be great ways to visit with friends in the summer months but can be dangerous for your dog. Alcohol, hot BBQ drippings and coals, skewers, and even ingesting certain (or too much) food can all cause your pet harm. Be mindful of the grill and remind guests to please not feed your pup!

12) Buckle up! Remember to restrain your pet in the car. This will keep them safe if the event of an accident, and also keep them from jumping from an open window.

If you are thinking about a summer vacation to include your special furry family member, please checimagesk out   Canine Camp Getaway Vacation .  It is a wonderful place to go and  located in the beautiful Lake George, NY area. Maybe all your friends with Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books http://www.tailsuntold.com will see you there.