Maximum’s NYC Tails Untold Personalized Adventure Book- A very pleased purchaser

Yes, I have received my book. I am very pleased with it. You did a super job on it. We laugh every time we look at it. I have shared it with More »

A Happy Fan – Storm’s Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book

Hello Tails Untold, I got the book today.  Thank you so much, it is amazing!   You did a lovely job, thank you, again.  Larissa from Australia. More »

Should I Adopt One Cat or Two?

When it comes to adopting a new cat or kitten, the question often arises is it better to adopt two so they can have companionship when we are not home? There are More »

New Babies and Your Pets

A new baby is on the way and your pets will need to adjust. After all, they were the new babies first. It is a lot like preparing a sibling for a More »

Sebastian is a Celebrity

Tails Untold is very proud to announce that Sebastian, who recently was the Star of a Tails Untold New York City Adventure Book was just featured in an article in the New More »

Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness-A guest blog from Dog Guy Josh

We are very pleased to have our guest blogger, Dog Guy Josh, share this wonderful article on how best to be prepared should an emergency or disaster strike.  Thank you, Dog Guy Josh!

Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness
By Dog Guy Josh

Pet First Aid – A Quick Primer
Pet First Aid: When the unexpected happens and your four-legged friend find himself on the injured list, knowing what to do can help him hurry up and heal so that you can heel!

petfirstaid

 

Define “Normal”
When dealing with injuries and potential illness, you won’t know what’s abnormal if you don’t know what’s normal for your dog to begin with. Take the time to familiarize yourself with your dog’s daily input and output (eating, urinating and defecating) habits, as well as how he moves and breathes and how his body feels under your hands as you pet him. Paying close attention to these details can help you quickly recognize when something might be wrong.

In general, the normal heart rate of a healthy dog is:

100-160 BPM for small, miniature or toy breed dogs (30 lbs or less).
60-100 BPM for medium-to-large breed dogs (30+ lbs).
120-160 BPM for puppies under one-year-old.
The heartbeat of a dog can be felt at the point where the left elbow reaches the chest, along the inner thigh, just below the wrist or just below the hock. Practice under calm conditions to determine which method is most comfortable for you and your pet, as well as to monitor his normal heart rate.

Other “Important Norms” to Know:
The normal breathing rate for a dog is 10-30 breaths per minute or up to 200 pants per minute.
The normal body temperature for a dog is approximately 100.2-102.8 degrees Fahrenheit. Temperatures not within this range should be addressed by a veterinarian.
Capillary refill time (the time it takes the gums or inner lips to return to their normal pink color after you press them) should be between 1-2 seconds.
When pulled upward, the skin at the back of a dog’s neck should spring back to position within 1-2 seconds. A longer return time can indicate dehydration. Dry, sticky gums may also signal dehydration. It’s extremely important that dehydrated animals be taken to a veterinarian for proper care. When in doubt, consult your vet!
The most important information to have on hand during a medical emergency is the name and phone number of the nearest veterinarian and 24-hour veterinary facility. Keep this information on-hand and consider taking a test drive to the local 24-hour facility BEFORE disaster strikes.
Learn Your ABCs!
Whether you’re dealing with pets or people, knowing how to properly administer CPR can mean the difference between life and death! Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) is the method used to treat an animal who is not breathing or has no heartbeat. It utilizes rescue breathing and chest compressions and is based on three basic principles which MUST be followed in order:

Airway
Breathing
Circulation
Learning how to properly perform CPR is a wonderful investment in your pet’s future. All pet owners should be proficient in this potentially life-saving, pet first aid skill. Several organizations, including the American Red Cross, offer classes on animal first aid and CPR.

Learn to Recognize a First Aid Emergency
The following medical situations can quickly turn from bad to worse and should be addressed as quickly as possible by a veterinarian:

Shock – The body’s response to a change in blood flow and oxygen to the internal organs. Shock often occurs following sudden blood loss, traumatic injury, severe allergic reaction or infection circulating through the body.
Bloat and Torsion – A condition in which the stomach fills up with air or food, which can cause the stomach to turn around itself, often misplacing the spleen. As this happens, blood supply to the stomach and spleen is lost, damaging the organs and resulting in shock. Bloat and torsion are life-threatening emergencies.
Other emergencies include:

Choking
Bleeding
Allergic Reactions
Luxated (out of joint) or Broken Bones
Breathing Problems
Sudden Trauma
Eye Injuries
Prolonged exposure to extreme temperatures
Training Tips
When preparing for an emergency, it’s as important to train your pet as it is to train yourself! Several easy-to train behaviors can help keep your pet calm and easily accessible during a medical emergency:

Handling and Restraint – Make a habit of handling and gently restraining your pet on a regular basis, rewarding him generously for calm behavior.
Muzzling – Don’t wait until disaster strikes! The best time to introduce your pet to a muzzle is NOT when he’s scared and hurting. Teach him to accept being muzzled by practicing often under calm conditions.
Elizabethan Collar – Like muzzling, teach your pet to calmly tolerate life in an E-Collar under normal conditions.
Confinement – Injured animals often must be confined in order to promote calm behavior necessary for healing. Even if you don’t use a crate on a regular basis, it’s wise to teach your dog to accept spending limited time in a crate or similar confined area.
Disaster Preparedness
Whether your geographic area is prone to earthquakes, fires, hurricanes, tornadoes or other natural disasters, it’s important to have a well thought out household evacuation plan. When planning ahead, consider the following:

Room at the Inn?
If you need to evacuate your home, do not leave your pets behind; they are not likely to survive on their own. For public health reasons, most emergency shelters do not accept pets. Research area hotels/motels that are pet-friendly and identify a few friends and family members who are willing to shelter your pets in an emergency.
May I See Your ID?
Make absolutely certain that your pets wear collars with identification tags at all times. Keep contact information up-to-date. Consider adding a cell phone number or an out-of-area friend or relative to maximize the opportunities for an appropriate caretaker to be contacted regarding your pet. Have your pets microchipped to provide them with a permanent source of identification.
Take Fido “To Go!”
Keep an appropriately sized crate or pet carrier on hand. In the event of a natural disaster, confining your pets in a crate may help prevent injuries from debris. If you do not regularly use a crate, consider occasionally feeding them in their crate to maintain a positive association with confinement.
Packing for Pets
Create a pet survival kit that’s kept in an easily accessible place and contains necessities like 2 weeks worth of pet food, bottled water, food/water bowls, can opener, medications, pet first aid kit and one or more sturdy leashes. Include current medical relevant information about your pet, contact information for your veterinarian as well as for any persons authorized to care for your pet in your absence. It may also be helpful to include a brief medical history and current photo.
Home Away from Home?
Make a list of area boarding facilities, veterinarian offices and shelters. In the event that you are unable to return home right away and need long-term care for your pets, these facilities can assist you in finding appropriate care.
Home Alone?
Not all emergencies take place when you’re home. Designate a nearby friend or family member to check on your pets if necessary. Add a Pet Rescue Sticker to your front door or window to alert rescue personnel of the type and number of animals inside. Stickers can be purchased at most pet stores and are available free of charge at www.aspca.org.

Check out more from Dog Guy Josh

Dog Trainer, Pet Blogger & Business Consultant  www.dogguyjosh.com

Resources:

ASPCA at www.aspca.org/pet-care/disaster-preparedness
ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center: (800) 426-4435 or www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control
Humane Society of the United States at www.humanesociety.org/about/departments/disaster_preparedness.html
American Red Cross at www.redcross.org
Pettech First Aid & CPR Training at www.pettech.net
Pet First Aid Kits:
www.cpr-savers.com
www.jjdog.com
www.outdoorsafety.net
HSUS Pet First Aid Kit List at www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/pet_first_aid_kit.html
A Quick Primer on Pet First Aid and Disaster Preparedness
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This was first published by the Association of Professional Dog Trainers, www.apdt.com, 1-800-PET-DOGS.

The Awesome Health Benefits of Having a Four-Legged Family Member

Image via Pixabay

Image via Pixabay

I’ve always been an animal lover, and grew up consistently having at least one family pet as my constant companion. But things change when you become the adult responsible for caring for a family dog, and the extra cleaning that comes with having a pet was not on a list of things I was dying to do!

But my husband and kids were dying to have a pooch in the house so we recently adopted an amazing mutt from a local shelter. It didn’t take long for me to fall absolutely in love, of course, especially after seeing what a positive influence she was on our family. As a matter of fact, I have science to support my claims: Research has shown that dogs provide a number of different emotional and physical health benefits to the humans that love them. Here are a few unique ways man’s best friend has a healthy impact on our lives:

Dogs inspire their owners to get moving. To take the best care of our pups, we have to ensure that they are getting plenty of exercise throughout the day. One of the best ways to do this is to join them in the fun! This article points out how having a family dog can also be an especially effective way to encourage children to play with their pet, and ward off the risk for childhood obesity.

Pooches are an adorable stress-buster. The reason we tend to feel better around our dogs is because interaction with them literally tells our brains to be happy. This article the health benefits of our dogs explains that spending time with our critters releases a hormone called oxytocin, a neurotransmitter known as the “love hormone” because of its role in making us feel connected with others. The higher our oxytocin levels, the more naturally equipped we are to handle stress.

They have potentially-lifesaving olfactory senses. Dogs are known for their acute sense of smell, and now they are using it to help their two-legged companions. Research has shown that dogs are able to detect health issues such as low blood sugar in diabetics and even some infections. Scientists are also now studying the canine ability to detect cancer, and hope to create a form of technology based on dogs’ natural gift of smell.

They provide uniquely compassionate therapy to those coping with cancer. Because of their abilities to boost the mood of those around them, dogs are frequent visitors to cancer patients undergoing treatment, and can be instrumental in managing emotional stress that often leads to serious mental health issues like depression. According to Cancer Treatment Centers of America, their presence also provides physical benefits such as a decrease in pain and blood pressure.

Dogs don’t just provide us with unconditional love and incessantly wagging tails. In fact, sharing our homes with them may actually provide many unique and wonderful health advantages. A new dog may even be the health remedy you’ve been seeking!

***

Thank you for this great information from our Guest Blogger, Vee Cecil!  Please let us know how your pet whether a cat/dog/bird/hamster/or any pet has improved your life!  We love your comments.

Vee Cecil is a wellness coach, personal trainer, and bootcamp instructor. Vee is passionate about studying and sharing her findings in wellness through her recently-launched blog.

Seizure Alert Dogs

Dog licking woman

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Most dogs are very perceptive at reading their owner’s body language. They seem to know when their owners are happy, sad, distressed or anxious. This ability has allowed some dogs to be able to sense changes in their owner’s body or behaviors prior to a seizure. They do this within seconds minutes or hours before the seizure occurs.

Dogs have their own ways of letting their owners know of an impending seizure. They may bark, become restless, paw at or lick their owner’s hand. This alerts the person to seek a safe place to sit or lie down to prevent falls that might occur with the seizure.

No one is sure why or how a dog is able to recognize that a seizure is coming. Theorists believe that it may be a change in the person’s behavior, body language or even an odor that the person emits prior to the seizure. This ability to recognize an impending seizure is not something that is trained and is a common phenomenon in many dogs. It does not seem to be related to a dog’s breed, age or whether the dog is a male or a female. Seizure alert dogs are ones that are very sensitive to a humans behavior or emotions. When a person comes out of a seizure, they tend to be disoriented or confused. Having their dog by their side can help re-orient them to their environment. Their dog’s presence is also a comfort. It is known that dogs can help to eliminate daily stressors in our lives. People with seizure disorders can sometimes increase their number of seizures when under stress. Having a loving canine companion may help to prevent this increase.

So seizure alert dogs are important to helping keep their owners safe. They help eliminate their owners fears of seizures and make their daily lives much easier.

Summer Safety Tips from Canine Camp Getaway Veterinarians

Cocker with visor 3Dog & cat heat

Hello All you Pet Lovers,

I am pleased to share this information from Canine Camp Getaway’s Veterinarians.  This is excellent advice and something I think all pet owners should review every summer, so please pass along.

1) Be cautious walking your dogs on hot pavement or cement — their pads are tough, but can burn just like your skin.

2) A summer haircut CAN help keep your pets cooler, but a too-short cut can make them even more vulnerable to the effects of sun and heat.

3) This seems like a no-brainer, but every year dogs die in hot cars. There is no “okay” time frame to leave a dog in a car in the summer.

4) Summer pests don’t only trouble humans — be sure your dog is protected from both internal and external parasites.

5) Drive carefully! More outdoor activities and open doors/windows can mean more dogs outside, on-leash and off, so slow down — and don’t get distracted by cell phones, texts or changing radio stations. Be sure to regularly inspect your yard for any holes or breaks in perimeter security.

6) Practice water safety — not all dogs can swim, especially in ocean water with waves and currents.

7) Be cautious of which pesticides, fertilizers, and mulches you or your landscaper are using; not all are pet-safe.

8) Wildlife is out and about — be sure your dog is current on vaccinations such as rabies and leptospirosis, if appropriate.

9) We see far more dog fights in the summer months than others — when socializing your dog at the park, be alert to his or her activities. Avoid distractions such as talking on your cell phone which may impede your response time.

10) Access to fresh, cold water is even more important now than other times of year.

11) BBQs can be great ways to visit with friends in the summer months but can be dangerous for your dog. Alcohol, hot BBQ drippings and coals, skewers, and even ingesting certain (or too much) food can all cause your pet harm. Be mindful of the grill and remind guests to please not feed your pup!

12) Buckle up! Remember to restrain your pet in the car. This will keep them safe if the event of an accident, and also keep them from jumping from an open window.

If you are thinking about a summer vacation to include your special furry family member, please checimagesk out   Canine Camp Getaway Vacation .  It is a wonderful place to go and  located in the beautiful Lake George, NY area. Maybe all your friends with Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books http://www.tailsuntold.com will see you there.

Separation Anxiety in Dogs

Why does my dog follow my every move? Why does my dog destroy things when I am away? Why does my dog pace or run in circles when I am leaving the house?

  • Cooper

These behaviors and others like:

  • Housebreaking accidents
  • Barking, howling, or whining
  • Not eating or not chewing on his/hers favorite toy
  • Scratching, digging, or trying to escape
  • Excessive grooming
  • Drooling

can be signs that your dog is suffering from separation anxiety.  Separation anxiety in terms of pets describes stress and anxiousness brought on by leaving your dog alone even if for a split second.  Often these signs are confused with “bad manners”, which is true in some cases, but not all.  Separation anxiety can be a serious issue and disciplining (eg. yelling or scolding), can make the anxiety worsen.  Often, regular obedience training does not help.

What can I do to help my dog get over separation anxiety?

First, please consult your veterinarian.  Sometimes the treatment requires a combination of medication(s) with behavior modification, especially when the case is severe.

What types of behavior modifications are suggested for separation anxiety?

First, be sure your dog is not bored by adding more physical and mental stimulation. This will usually take care of  boredom issues but will usually not take care of separation anxiety issues.   Often bored dogs will scarf down their food then look for more, anywhere including your garbage, but in most cases, the opposite is true of a dog with separation anxiety.

Behaviorists suggest changing up your “leaving routine”.  Your pet is very aware of your routine before leaving home, grabbing your coat first, or shutting off the lights, then lastly grabbing your keys.  Mix this up and do some of these things randomly during the day while you are still remaining home.  In time, perhaps only a few weeks, your dog may see that these behaviors don’t mean you are leaving and some or all of this anxiety may lessen greatly.

Also, don’t overcompensate your departure or return.  Don’t give treats or give special attention before you leave or when you return.  Don’t fuss over them, as hard as this is to do, especially when you are so happy to see them when you come home.  Try to ignore your dog for a few minutes before you leave and when you return.  Your dog may get the idea that your leaving is not a big deal.

For extreme cases, there is a program you can try, but first, consult your veterinarian to be sure there your dog is not suffering from some other ailment or illness. This program *  requires a huge time commitment on your part, at least several weeks.    This  will mean you will need to take time off ,if you work, use your vacation time, or find a pet sitter or doggie daycare to assist you.  You will need to spend 30 minutes to an hour every training session.  It requires patience and consistency.  Initially, you leave your home for a few seconds and step right back in so your pet has little or no time to experience separation anxiety.  Always stay calm while inside. Continue to do this until you see no signs of anxiety.  Gradually increase the time you are out, but change up the time (eg. 2 minutes, 1 minute, 4 minutes, 1 minute, 5 minutes) until you see no signs of anxiety.  You continue to do this gradually increasing to an hour, two hours, etc. until you can be away a full work day.

If this does not help, you will need to contact your veterinarian,again, who, hopefully will be able to help you find the cause of your dog’s anxiety issues and perhaps recommend an experience behaviorist who has worked with this disorder and/or prescribe proper medication.

*This program is suggested by Amy Bender, Dog Expert (www.dogs.about.com).

Please note: This article has been provided for informational purposes only. If your pet is showing any signs of illness, please consult a veterinarian as quickly as possible.

 

Emilia reading Cosette’s Tails Untold Personalized Adventure Book

front cover_db copy Cosette copyEmilia clipped 3

Here is Emilia reading her family’s special Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book all about her favorite doggy Cosette.  Emilia loved seeing her entire family’s picture in her very own, one of a kind book.   Most of all Mary Kate and Emilia loved seeing Cosette take a trip to New York City.  They were so happy to receive this special personalized gift.

Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book Donation

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Thanks to another Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book purchase www.tailsuntold.com,, we are so pleased to contribute to the Mayor’s Alliance for  NYC’s Animals, NYC Feral Cat Organization.  Here is the link:  http://nycferalcat.org.  The New York City Feral Cat Initiative (NYCFCI) is a program of the Mayor’s Alliance for NYC’s Animals. (Please note, this organization is not associated with any political office).  This Alliance is committed to solving NYC’s feral cat overpopulation crisis through the humane, non-lethal method of Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR).  We appreciate all that they do to contribute to making our pet world a better place so that someday, maybe every cat/dog & other pets will have loving and forever homes.

 

 

Aliyah and her Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book

Chloe's Book

Chloe’s Book

 

Aliyah reading her book

Click above to see a video of  Sweet Aliyah reading her very own, one of a kind, beautifully illustrated, Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book.  She was so excited when she heard her name and then to see her favorite dog, Chloe, taking a New York Adventure trip and telling her all about it.   If you would like to have your very own Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book, where your pet is the narrator and the star, visit www.tailsuntold.com.

A great Valentine’s Day Photo Contest

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Hey Everyone, Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books is having another great Facebook Photo Contest!  To celebrate Valentine’s Day, join in the fun and send in your pet and your “Kissing or Hugging Photos”.  What fun!  Go to:  www.facebook.com/TailsUntoldBooks. to enter to win a beautiful hand painted fridge magnet created by our wonderful friend and great artist, Peggy Matheson.

Please also share this with all your friends!  The more kisses and hugs, the merrier! Happy Valentine’s Day!

Happy to donate to the Connecticut Humane Society

CT Humane Society

Tails Untold Personalized Pet Books is so pleased to make a donation to the Connecticut Humane Society thanks to Lois’s purchase of a Tails Untold Personalized Pet Book for Steve and her special cat, Foxboro.  Foxboro was such a cute orange tiger cat.   He is now playing at the Rainbow Bridge.

Here is their mission statement.

Mission Statement

“The Connecticut Humane Society is the leading resource in the state for companion animal welfare, enriching the lives of families and communities through adoption services, medical care, education, and prevention of cruelty.”